Program » Workshops

2nd Workshop on a Research Agenda for
Maintenance and Evolution of
Service-Oriented Systems (MESOA)


Organizers

Grace A. Lewis
Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute, USA
Dennis B. Smith
Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute, USA
Kostas Kontogiannis
National Technical University of Athens, Greece

Monday, September 29, 09:00–17:30

Abstract

The main goal of this workshop is to provide an opportunity for participants to present current work and have a lively discussion of open issues for the maintenance and evolution of service-oriented systems. The dialog will include both short-term research issues such as reengineering processes and long-term issues such as evolution patterns for service-oriented systems. The current version of a SOA research agenda will be used as a starting point for discussion.

Contact

Information

2nd MESOA

Workshop theme and goals

Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is having a significant impact on the way software systems are developed, maintained, and evolved over time. Organizations as diverse as banks, health care providers, and government organizations are focusing on SOA as a way to reach a previously unachievable level of interoperability among systems and agility within business practices.

As service-oriented systems are deployed, a main concern is now their maintenance and evolution. The main goal of this workshop is to create a focal point and an ongoing forum for researchers and practitioners to share results and open issues in the area of maintenance and evolution of service-oriented systems.

SOA and software maintenance and evolution

Because SOA impacts a broad set of areas within software engineering, its significance needs to be addressed in a comprehensive way. We have developed an SOA research agenda that has been presented at several international conferences (CASCON 2006 and 2007, CSMR 2007 and 2008, IESA 2007, ICCBSS 2007, and ICSE 2007, and ICSM 2007), as well as at Canada’s Consortium for Software Engineering Research (CSER). The research agenda identifies research needs in engineering, business, operations, as well as cross-cutting areas. The workshops at CSMR (SOAM) and ICSM (MESOA) focused on maintenance and evolution of service-oriented systems, a very important area under Engineering in the proposed taxonomy of SOA research topics. The discussions at these workshops indicated the need for greater research and industry collaboration in these areas and motivated us to create an ongoing space for sharing results and open issues.

Service-oriented systems are significantly different from traditional systems, resulting in new research issues that need to be addressed. These differences include: (1) the diversity of service consumers and service providers, (2) shorter release cycles because of the capability of rapidly adapting to changing business needs, and (3) the potential to leverage legacy investments with potentially minimal change to existing systems.

Given that SOA adoption is fairly recent, much of current research has focused on the earlier stages of the lifecycle. The goal of this workshop is to focus on the later stages of the life cycle, where there are two main concerns are from a maintenance and evolution perspective: (1) deployed service-oriented systems need to be maintained and evolved and (2) legacy systems will increasingly migrate to SOA environments to make legacy functionality available to internal and external service consumers.

An important question is therefore: What does maintenance and evolution look like in this dynamic, heterogeneous and potentially distributed development and maintenance environment? Potential research topics of relevance to software maintenance and evolution of service-oriented systems include the following:

  • Tools, techniques and environments to support maintenance activities
  • Multilanguage system analysis and maintenance
  • Reengineering processes for migration to SOA Environments
  • Evolution patterns of service-oriented systems
  • Tools for the verification and validation of compliance with constraints during maintenance and evolution activities
  • Round-trip engineering in service-oriented systems


Specifically for maintenance and evolution of service-oriented systems, our research shows that in the short term, maintenance and evolution practices will have to evolve and adapt to support a dynamic and changing environment, taking into consideration the emergence of third-party services over which there is less control and visibility. Tools and techniques to support maintenance and evolution activities in these environments, reengineering processes that combine business as well as technical aspects, and capabilities for multi-language analysis are a good starting point.

Long-term goals of workshop

This workshop will focus on research areas related to maintenance and evolution of service-oriented systems. We aim to encourage the development of a broad community of interest in this area.

Results of this and other workshops will be used to evolve the SOA research agenda that we hope will become a point of reference for people looking for SOA research topics in academia and industry.

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2nd International Workshop on
Advanced Software Development Tools and Techniques (WASDeTT):

Tools for Software Maintenance, Visualization, and Reverse Engineering

Organizers

Holger M. Kienle
University of Victoria, Canada
Leon Moonen
Simula Research Laboratory, Norway
Michael W. Godfrey
University of Waterloo, Canada
Hausi A. Müller
University of Victoria, Canada

Friday, October 3, 09:00–17:30

Abstract

The objective of the 2nd International Workshop on Advanced Software Development Tools and Techniques (WASDeTT) is to provide interested researchers with a forum to share their tool building experiences and to explore how tools can be built more effectively and efficiently. This workshop specifically focuses on tools for software maintenance and comprehension and addresses issues such as tool-building in an industrial context, component-based tool building, and tool building in teams.

Contact

Information

2nd WASDeTT

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1st Workshop on
Maintenance and Evolution of
Free/Libre/Open Source Software (MEFLOSS)


Organizers

Gregorio Robles
Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Spain
Daniel M. German
University of Victoria, Canada
Andrea Capiluppi
University of Lincoln, UK

Friday, October 3, 09:00–12:30

Abstract

During the last years Free/Libre/Open Source Software (FLOSS) has gained much attention in the Software Evolution and Maintenance research community. While much research uses FLOSS as case studies where data and experience can be easily obtained, there are other FLOSS-specific issues that should be devoted further efforts. Among these aspects the most interesting one is how the evolution and maintenance of a given FLOSS project is affected by other FLOSS projects and their communities.

Contact

Information

Motivation

During the last years Free/Libre/Open Source Software (FLOSS) has gained much attention in the Software Evolution and Maintenance research community. This is due to various reasons that range from the availability of the software product to the archival of past software and nonsoftware artifacts in versioning repositories, bug tracking systems and mailing lists, among others.

While much research uses FLOSS as case studies where data and experience can be easily obtained (as can be noted from many papers published in the main ICSM conference track during the last years), there are other FLOSS-specific issues that, in the opinion of the workshop organizers, should be devoted further efforts. Among these aspects the most interesting one is how the evolution and maintenance of a given FLOSS project is affected by other FLOSS projects and their communities. This includes how (technical and non-technical) knowledge flows between projects, the impact of the software dependencies on the evolution of the own software, the impact of the licensing terms and other intellectual property rights on the evolution of the software or how (technical and non-technical) decisions of some FLOSS applications may affect other FLOSS applications.

Main topics of discussion

The overarching theme of this workshop will be “How is the evolution and maintenance of a FLOSS project affected by other FLOSS projects and communities?”. Specifically, the goal of this workshop is to bring together academic researchers, industry members and FLOSS developers for the purpose of discussing, among others:

  • Does FLOSS projects evolve in a manner that is different from proprietary software? Are there commonalities between the evolution of FLOSS and proprietary software? Can we infer general models of software of evolution from FLOSS only? What are the risks of studying primarily FLOSS as the basis for research in software evolution and maintenance? Research in software evolution has greatly benefited from the availability of FLOSS and their histories. It is not well understood, however, how similar or different the evolution patterns of both are, and if we can derive universal models of software evolution by just looking at FLOSS.
  • Are there different patterns of evolution and maintenance in FLOSS? Are these germane to their domain, or the characteristics of their communities?
  • How does (technical and non-technical) knowledge flow between projects? There is wide factual evidence of FLOSS projects exchanging and copying source code, methods and ideas from other FLOSS projects. How does this flow of knowledge happen?
  • How do software dependencies impact the evolution of a given software system? FLOSS is rarely executed in isolation and often require to be linked to other software products, or for other products to be installed during its execution.
  • How do (technical and non-technical) decisions of FLOSS applications affect other FLOSS applications? Although completely unrelated and with no common communities, some decisions taken by some projects may affect other FLOSS projects and their evolution. Such is the case of the Harmony toolkit, which sought to duplicate the Qt Toolkit under a free software license, until Qt was definitely released under the terms of the General Public License and hence made the Harmony project unnecessary and its development was abandoned.
  • How do licensing terms and other intellectual property rights affect the evolution of the software? Software is released and delivered under certain legal conditions, which are specified in the license. The selection of a license preselect those who can reuse the software. The rise in number of license and versions of these license suppose new situations that have to be managed.
  • What is the impact of foundations (and other types of organizations created to drive the long term success of the project) in the evolution of FLOSS? Many projects have chosen to create foundations who are responsible for the management and planning of such project.
  • How can the FLOSS evolution and maintenance research help FLOSS projects and their developers?


Structure

MEFLOSS is intended to be an event that will encourage participation and collaboration via presentations and open discussions.

The workshop will be divided in three main parts. In the first part one or two invited talks will be presented; these will be presented by experts in the field. In the second part of the workshop participants will be invited to present their papers. The third part of the workshop will be dedicated to discussion of the submitted papers and other major issues relevant to the workshop. The objective of the workshop is to be highly interactive, and to promote discussion and collaboration among its participants.

The workshop will be open to anybody who is interested. We will solicit position and preliminary research papers. Presenters will be selected from these accepted submissions.

Major goals

The first and most visible outcome of the workshop will be a collection of position and research papers submitted by its participants. It is also expected that this workshop will lead to the establishment of a longer-term community interested in software maintenance and evolution of FLOSS.

The presentations and discussions of this workshop will be summarized in a report that will be published.

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